Congratulations to Colin McMullan, 2018 Summer Stipend recipient

“Tree juice,” says Colin McMullan, is “a medium for regaining our spiritual unity with the natural world, and our sense of belonging here, by reclaiming our ancestral indigenous knowledge of this specific land.”

And that’s just a teaser for his project, “Tree Spa for Urban Forest Healing.” The rest of the project — tapping neighborhood maple trees, refining the sap, drinking the juice, cooking food in the steam generated as a byproduct of the maple syrup evaporation process, and discussing community issues while relaxing in a communal steamroom — captured the imagination of our panelists and won Colin the Macktez Summer Stipend.

Here are a few of the comments we received:

“A very interesting concept that tackles multiple topics via a unique, single installation.”

“I like that it’s a social activity and space (the spa) that engenders people to come together and to learn about one another. It’s a project made from a personal place but for other people.

“Combining a commitment to literal and social mobility, and emphasizing the enmeshed nature of social, physical, and ecological infrastructure, the Tree Spa for Urban Forest Healing outlines an ambitious but achievable prospect for new relationships between, trees, people, and objects. Bravo!”

“I really appreciate how totally therapeutic the process feels — to the participants and to the earth.”

For more about “Tree Spa” read Colin’s full proposal and check out Hartford Maple on Facebook.

08-08-2018 | Stipend

2018 Summer Stipend Finalists Announced

Below are the application submissions from our finalists, currently being reviewed by our Summer Stipend Panelists:

 


Aliya Bonar

Project: Fear Suits

Goal

We – myself and my collaborator Eliza Fernand – are creating costumes and installation that embodies and sparks fears: both fears about yourself and fears about others. The piece is a continuation of a body of artwork, “Anti-PowerSuits” which physically manifests negative thoughts into costume form, making it possible to play and address these thoughts outside of your head.

At this moment in time politically and personally I am dealing with constant negative thoughts, resignation, and fears – am I doing this right? Is this worth it? Am I contributing to the solution? Will our planet even survive another generation? These costumes have not only been fun to create but they also give me space to really dig into those fears and share them publicly without just complaining. It’s a productive conversation starter, and a way to connect with fellow artists and casual audience members about their own fears.

This iteration is especially exciting as it will be connected to a “Haunted House” event, directly meshing our public and private fears. What is ok to be afraid about with other people, versus what are fears I need to keep to myself? Additionally, while Eliza and I have worked together in the past as curator/artist, friends, and members of a larger group, this will be one of the first times we are making work together as collaborators.

The project will be installed and performed as part of the Wassaic Project’s Haunted Mill exhibition in October 2018 in Wassaic, NY. While inclusion in this program will allow our work to reach a larger audience, the honorarium provided by the hosting organization are insufficient to cover our travel, materials, and installation assistance. Which is how the Macktez Stipend would provide a huge support.

Project needs

To finish the project we need to design and produce 3-4 costumes as well as the corresponding installation. We will need funding to purchase supplies/materials; specialty fabrics, technical supplies for garment construction, structural components for the installation. We will spend funds on traveling to Wassaic and daily needs/meals during the production/installation time. We are planning on spending a week in Wassaic ahead of time to do finish the costumes and install the piece on site.

Costume Production: $530
– specialty fabrics: $300
– thread, sewing machine needles: $30
– additional (non-fabric) materials (likely sourced from thrift stores and local dollar stores): $200

Installation Construction: $85
– (10) 2×4 braces for creating fabric wall: $3.50 each, $35 total
– wood screws, hanging hooks, fishing line, staple gun staples: $50

Travel/Installation Period: $640
– food/meals: (2 people for 5 days; national per diem rate $64 per day; $640 total) estimated actual cost: $350
– Travel to Wassaic by car from NYC (Aliya): $40
– Travel to Wassaic by plane from MI (Eliza): $250 (already purchased)

Current Project Support:
– housing and studio space for Eliza and Aliya covered at Wassaic Project during installation period (1 week)
– Access/use of Wassaic Project Wood Shop and Print Shop
– Wassaic Project honorarium of $100
– in-kind material donations from Materials for the Arts (including some fabrics, notions, etc)
– Aliya’s NYC studio space (already rented)
– Eliza’s plane trip to NYC (already purchased)
===
Estimated Remaining Project Needs: $1155

Project description

The Macktez Stipend would be used to develop and produce original costumes embodying personal and public fears. The costumes are part of an interactive community-focused “Haunted Mill” exhibition hosted by the art residency program, the Wassaic Project in Wassaic NY.

Eliza and myself are taking on this project as a way to explore a new context for our work and collaborate in a new way together. While we are forging ahead to make this project with or without the Macktez Stiepend, your support would allow us to delve deeper into the concept, use materials that match the exact needs of each costume/character and produce a fully realized project.

Personally, this work feels very relevant and urgent to this moment. I’m constantly overwhelmed by and the huge political, environmental, global instability I hear about in the news every day; this in turn affects my personal life, bringing out fears that I can’t make a difference, fears that it’s all too much. This piece will create a new – playful and outrageous – space to engage with our intimate fears in a public, productive, and ultimately impactful way.


Victoria Manganiello

Project: Computer 1.0

Goal

“Computer 1.0” is an interactive installation artwork created in collaboration by artist Victoria Manganiello and designer Julian Goldman. We have created a textile through which colored liquid is pumped. The liquid is controlled by a computer code which in turn creates patterns along the surface of the textile transforming it into a moving screen. Inspired by the history of the computer and the similarities between the historical universality of textiles and the modern universality of technologies, this installation is meant to be an artwork, design object and also an educational experience for viewers.

Project needs

Our installation is nearly complete. We simply require two high-powered pumps to operate the system we have produced. The pair costs $878.52 before shipping fees and any incidental installation hardware costs. We are in dialogue with an important New York City arts space who is interested in displaying our piece. This space will also accommodate us to conduct supplemental educational and interactive experiences so that the general public could not simply engage but learn more about our concepts.

Project description

Master silk weaver, Joseph Marie Jacquard, developed the first conception of a computer in 1801. It was a mechanical loom that could run what we now understand as a ‘program’ to create detailed and elaborate textiles without painstaking manual labor. This was the first machine capable of automated task production, and the first known use of binary code. Though Jacquard’s loom performed a task we take for granted in it’s simplicity today, the technology eventually led to the groundbreaking work of inventors Charles Babbage, Ada Lovelace, and Alan Turing.

The Jacquard loom then is not just a relic, but also the first ancestor, the Adam and Eve, to our modern computers. Because this history is all but forgotten in our understanding of humanity’s digital maturation, Computer 1.0 seeks to pay homage to the forbearers of computer history. The representation of this digital ghost is produced with hand-woven cloth and a programmed kinetic surface that brings to mind data, code, and communication infrastructure.

Jacquard’s loom was an enormous driver to the Industrial Revolution, simultaneously fostered the environment for the Luddite revolt as the work of thousands of laborers became increasingly mechanized. Computer 1.0 seeks to function as a historical lens that shows how our relationship to computing technology has always been fraught with juxtaposed promises of utopian and dystopian futures, while the reality consistently finds itself somewhere in between.

This installation reminds it’s onlookers that society has been grappling with a digital existentialism and the question of ‘are we better off?’ since the birth of programming itself. In this way, Computer 1.0 is the physical display of the eternally uncertain potential of technology.


Teresa Meier

Project: What I Know, Remember, and Forgot from Camelia Street

Goal

I am working on creating several professional printed portfolios for the current project that I am working on (Please see artist statement for the project below). As a fine artist a printed portfolio is necessary for acquiring gallery representation and a critical component in attending portfolio reviews, which are vital for networking and promoting and sharing your work among industry professionals.

Artist Statement ~ “What I Know, Remember, and Forgot from Camelia Street”

I contemplate the shared truths of the human story–love, fear, home, family, birth, aging, dying–through the lens of the surreal. In a series of autobiographical self-portraits, I examine identity within the context of family history and birthplace. The work tackles the interwoven complexities of past and present and, specifically, how the past shapes and dictates our perception of our present self and relationships. I encourage introspection and inspire awe through journey-like narratives and fantastical landscapes embedded with unexpected juxtapositions of characters and settings.

The images are best printed and viewed 48”x72”

Project needs

I have all the necessary tools, knowledge, and skill to create a portfolio, but I could use help with the cost of materials.

Each portfolio costs approximately $200 in materials to make, so this grant would allow me to make five.

Project description

I’m developing multiple printed and boxed portfolios of the project, “What I Know, Remember, and Forgot from Camelia Street” for the purpose of sending to galleries, prospective clients, and portfolio reviews.

I’m currently planning on attending the Medium San Diego portfolio review in October and am seeking gallery representation beyond the Portland Art Museum Rental Sales Gallery.

More images: http://www.teresameier.com/behind-the-scenes


Colin McMullan

Project: Tree Spa for Urban Forest Healing

Goal

My recent creative research involves sharing wild foods, indigeneity, interspecies communication, environmental justice, and decolonization. This stems from a deep connection with the eastern woodlands of North America, based on my conflicted Indigenous/settler heritage. The Indigenous part of my family was assimilated into whiteness due to policies of genocide against Indigenous Peoples, several generations ago. So we have gained our white privilege, but we need to pay attention also to what we have lost. With that background, I am in the midst of a long project involving the aestheticized collection of tree sap, and ways to encourage its wider use. This TREE JUICE, as we prefer to call it, we see as a medium for regaining our spiritual unity with the natural world, and our sense of belonging here, by reclaiming our ancestral indigenous knowledge of this specific land.

Starting in the winter of 2017/2018, our TREE SPA project operates out of the Keney Park Sustainability Project, a Black-led educational/healing urban farm, based in Keney Park. Keney is a neglected Olmsted-designed 700 acre park in the North End of Hartford, a neighborhood with a poverty rate near 50%. We are tapping maple trees in this park, at Hartford public schools, a nearby university, and private residences. This informal situation brings people together for conversation, food, and reconnection with the land. Here participants observe the maple syrup production process, while “taking the waters” of the trees, in a healing process similar to the history of mineral spas. Steam is a necessary byproduct of tree syrup evaporation that is imaginatively utilized in the spa with significant aesthetic impact.

This TREE SPA concept is a variation on the healing traditions of many world cultures, including the Scandinavian sauna, Islamic hammam, Russian banya, sweat lodges and maple sugaring camps of various Indigenous Peoples of Turtle Island (a.k.a. America), and the modern Japanese notion of Forest Bathing. In our case, the steam from reducing maple syrup is combined with other wildcrafted substances to create an essence of the forest, which is beneficial to our individual wellbeing, and that of our human and non-human communities. It is important that this experience honors the varied traditional cultural practices mentioned, and yet clearly functions as a contemporary, postcolonial manifestation of our fractured-yet-connected, terrified-yet-hopeful, global society. A transcultural space such as this could provide people of varied backgrounds a unifying experience appropriate to our identity-fluid contemporary moment. This is one excellent reason for the project to inhabit a contemporary art context, as this milieu is inherently transdisciplinary, experimental, unconventional, and risky.

Project needs

I am in the last construction phase of the project, building the steamroom structure, and the ventilation system connecting it to the evaporation room. I have a grant of $2000 from Artspace New Haven to produce the finished system by October to premiere it at an arts festival then. I need more money for materials and labor to finish it, which is why I’m coming to you. I would use the $1000 you are offering to buy roofing, vent pipes, and Stress Skin Panels, which will constitute the framing and insulation for the structure. Any extra money would go towards labor, either my own or that of a helper.

Project description

We started the Hartford Maple Syrup Club in 2017, an off-campus expansion of the maple syrup project that was previously operated by the Sculpture Club at Hartford Art School. HMSC has partnered with Herb Virgo of the Keney Park Sustainability Project, Lauren Little of Knox Parks, and Artspace New Haven‘s CWOS, to build the reach of social-engagement for this project.

In winter of 2017/2018 we built a mobile sugar shack, tapped trees in Keney park and at schools and residences in Hartford, and ran a series of tree-tapping workshops for area kids in collaboration with Knox Parks. We celebrated the maple syrup harvest with our third annual BYOBatter Pancake Festival, at the Keney Park Pond House, on March 10, 2018.

The continually expanding TREE SPA seeks additional uses for the steam generated as a byproduct of the maple syrup evaporation process. Participants will take the healing waters of the trees and discuss important matters affecting our communities, in the relaxing social space of a communal steamroom, while drinking tree juice and eating food steamed in the very same steam! We are now building the steamroom, and connecting it to the evaporation room with a system of ventilation pipes. Both of these structures are built onto trailers, for maximum portability and the element of surprise. Who knows where the TREE SPA will turn up next?!


Candace Thompson

Project: The Collaborative Urban Resilience Banquet (The C.U.R.B.)

Goal

The C.U.R.B. is a transmedia social practice project that examines issues of urbanism, food, climate, survival, remediation, interdependence and multi-species ethnography. I am documenting my multi-year process as I learn about/with/from Brooklyn’s various plant and animal species, many of whom have long, complicated relationships with humans. I will present my discoveries through digital storytelling and at a series of seasonal community meals foraged entirely from the Brooklyn streets.

Our city is not a ‘clean’ place, so I’m currently learning to harvest, process and store these foods in collaboration with a creative chef and a soil and plant toxicologist. Why are our neighborhoods polluted, what effect does that have, and what can we do about it? Could pickle brine remove lead from wild spinach? Could pigeon droppings remediate heavy metals from the soil? These culinary experiments will be paired with community ‘curbside’ tastings and web content that engages the digital and IRL community in discussions of decolonization, resilience, healing, legacy, accountability, class privilege and more. For instance, amaranth started its migration to Brooklyn when Cortes burned the Aztec’s grain fields, and pigeons have transformed from a colonial luxury food to the reviled “rats with wings” we all know today. So which is grosser: a large scale chicken farm or a Brooklyn pigeon coop? Which is healthier: big pharma’s sleeping pills or park-foraged mugwort ale? How local is too local? What do we do if our food supply fails? Where does “all natural” stop and start? And in a global society, is anyone ever truly ‘invasive’?

A millennial hybrid of Agnes Denes’ Wheatfield and Agnes Varda’s The Gleaners and I, “The C.U.R.B.” is a playful, approachable, (non?)humanist look at 21st century entanglement and interdependence. This project will connect community members to the siloed research of scientists, ethnobotanists, community land advocates, park rangers, agro-industry experts and fellow artists from the #weedyresistance to create a complex and multi-disciplinary quilt of humans and their evolving relationship to the ‘urban wilds’. My goal is not to encourage mass foraging, per se, but to ask us all to look at urban space as a place of complexity and value, placing ourselves in direct relationship to our surroundings. If humans want to survive the hot mess we’ve made, perhaps we should take some cues from the beings currently surviving and thriving in our wastelands.

Project needs

My project is a multi-year endeavor with several iterations:

Throughout the 2018 growing season I have been collecting samples of various edible plant (and some animal) species from across Brooklyn and processing them in various ways. For each species I collect two samples: one from a local green space such as a park, and one from a more industrial or ‘curbside’ spot, such as a tree bed or abandoned lot. Mugwort, mulberries, amaranth, Asian shore crabs, Japanese knotweed, wild spinach, peppergrass and more are then being processed in various ways such as fermentation, dehydration, freezing, preserving, and pickling.

Once the harvest season is done I will be submitting my samples to Cornell where soil scientist Murray McBride will allow to me to use their inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer to test the samples for heavy metals such as lead, cadmium, and arsenic. Each sample I get tested at Cornell costs $30. As of this moment I am estimated to have about 50 samples to submit for testing for a total of $1500.00 worth of expenses.

I am hopeful that down the line I will be able to find ways to test samples for other contaminants such as glyphosates, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) and more.

Project description

The $1,000 would go directly to the costs for my 2018 toxicity tests. I am in the process of building foundational relationships and applying for grants to fund everything hereafter!

More images: https://vimeo.com/265933028/baac95cd12


Esteban Valdez

Project: ALONE

Goal

At the time of this projects conception, I was going through a very nihilistic period of my life. Things didn’t make sense to me and I questioned the very nature of Being and what it all really, truly authentically meant and, furthermore, why should I care about the very nature of existence. That period of my life was very real, very dark, and very scary to say the least. To question Being, being unable to see the value in it all really made me desperate to find answers that would sustain me from making decisions which would have ultimate consequences to which the word “regret” doesn’t do the scenario any real justice.

As simple as this film is, finding the energy and the mental will to continue moving forward really took a tremendous amount of effort and energy, not so much in terms of physically moving forward through production, but because as I continued to move forward, I continued to ask questions and discovering new ideas and thoughts about this world and Being and that the more I continued to work on this project, I could sense that I was getting closer and closer to an answer. If not the answer, then at least another level of enlightenment that would make sense to me. Through the course of this project, I shared what I was working on with others and their responses really challenged me to stake my claim logically and philosophically. Many people found the short film, while simple in it’s conception, to be rather dark which had a profound impact on their ideology of life and living as a whole. The very idea that maybe there really is nothing else outside of our known experience terrifies them, though through discussion and thinking; we’re all able to come to the idea that in the case that there is nothing after this life, the fact remains that we exist here and now and that we really must do all that we can to preserve ourselves, our world and if anything, really look at our priorities in terms of human progress. But why should we care about human progress if there’s no value or meaning to it all? What’s the point? There is a moment in the film where we’re put face to face with the abyss, in the absolute silence and darkness of the screen. We see nihilism, the darkness, for what it is. Empty, void of all life and meaning and containing no answers. Something that offers no values and doesn’t care either way.

When I came face to face with that, it really got me thinking that no matter what, whether meaning and existence are valuable is up to us. What are we willing to put our Being towards? Are we going to try to point at something that we can actually and realistically contribute too, or are we going to point it towards worlds unknown because we hate what we have before us? In the beginning of the film, we see the explosion of life, the beginning of it all and the formation of the known universe. As we travel through the valley of spacetime, we see our own emergence in time and all that we’ve accomplished from the dawn of civilization to now and come to terms that we’re nothing more than just a blip on the timeline itself. That we still haven’t figured it all out and that we’re still striving. That even though we’ve gone through the ages of empires, and we fall time and time again, we rise like a phoenix to continue on striving to get it right until the moment we’ve decided to leave it all to our own technological arrogance. When we cease to care for each other and our world and instead opt to leave it rather than try to continue to strive to make it better. As we travel through the vacuum of space, in the darkness, we’re putting our hopes in ourselves to some degree, but irresponsibly so, until we come to the conclusion that maybe what we think we want isn’t exactly what we needed but it could be too late. The journey’s over. And because we misplaced our focus to somewhere other than the here and now, in each other, the emptiness of the void showed us what lies beyond.

In a way, I find that ALONE is a very hopeful and grounded story which tells us to look within. To look at each other and to see that we are valuable and that our lives do carry with it meaning. Yes, existence is difficult. It’s not easy. But simply to pack up and leave it, to travel into the darkness which offers no sustainable answers, no honest solutions; how could we possibly think that an answer like this will help us withstand life when all it does is tell us to end it? And who are we to make that make such a judgement?

“One recognizes one’s course by discovering the paths that stray from it.” – Albert Camus

If there is anything that I hope the viewer will get from this is a renewed sense and appreciation of life. To see the emptiness and the vapidness of our own arrogance and maybe to reconsider their current views of Being in a more constructive and positive light.

Project needs

As of this writing, we will have completed post production on animation and will be entering the audio phase of our project. The audio phase consists of generating sound effects, music scoring, music licensing and mixing and mastering which will cost $1,500 USD. The Macktez Summer Stipend will help us offset the cost of audio production, giving us the opportunity to use the additional money for film festival marketing costs and fees.

Project description

World war, natural disasters, famine and disease has set Earth on a crash course with destruction when an Earth-Like planet named “Kepler 186F,” is discovered. With excitement and hope, the greatest minds of a generation come together to plot the course and create the plan to send a robot, Kepler, to deliver life continuing cargo through 560 light years of interstellar space to Earth’s distant cousin in order to rebuild a new home.

“ALONE” explores the concept of what it means to travel through the deepest, darkest, regions of space and the possible realities of what we might find when we get to our destination, hope or fear.

Set to the classical score of Joseph Haydn, “ALONE” tells a subliminal story through the lens of heavy detailed compositions and subtle pacing.


Chihsuan Yang

Project: ESCP

Goal

For me, the essence of bing a musician is to act as a bridge between cultural diversities. In doing so, my motivations not only involve a diligent personal drive, but my belief that music contains a power beyond my teachings in school. I began my musical training at age six learning classical violin, piano, and erhu: a Chinese, two-stringed instrument. As I continue to explore how music unites and uplifts others, I am overwhelmed with gratitude for how it has enriched my life. That is why I continue to show my appreciation by sharing my love and knowledge of music in any way possible.

My interest in all types of music revealed opportunities far beyond my imagination: from playing chamber music with a blues legend, to being a member of a world music ensemble with flamenco dancers. In my free time, I enjoy visiting local hospitals to play music for patients with terminal illnesses or cardiovascular diseases, much like the heart defect I was diagnosed with as a child.
I have collaborated with internationally renowned artists from Senegal, India, Syria, Spain, Brazil, Malaysia, Japan, and China. I also lead educational demonstrations in schools ranging from kindergarten classrooms to university lecture halls, focusing on the dynamics of music and showcasing the erhu as a cultural significance within my heritage.

While sharing my knowledge and spreading awareness of my work are important to me, there is a deeper, more profound objective. It lives within the exhilarating exchange of energy between listener and performer and is the driving force behind my creativity and musical appreciation: to witness segregations of language, race, or religion dissolve within a melodic movement; to see a rhythm move young and old alike; or to observe humanity blossom within a song—revealing these beautiful instances is a constant aim and matters most to me when creating my work.

Project needs

The cost of producing/pressing physical albums, photographer for album arts, videographers and basic recording essentials, studio time. mixing/sound engineering. We hope to accomplish all of that within $5000.

Project description

ESCP is a duo consisting of Chihsuan Yang and Bob Garrett. Together we weave a rich soundscape to engage our audience. Refusing to be confined by our instruments and professional stigma or constructs of composition. Our goal is to develop live performances that fuse various mediums of creativity, technology, musical instruments, dance, visual art, musical expansions and improvisations. While it is hard to describe the subtle nuances of the music, it explores the presence of music as soundtracks to our lives.

I have always been drawn to movie soundtracks. To me they can amplify the emotional impact of the overall experience. As a performer, I would like to use a variety of resources to convey, to express and to communicate that emotional content. Dance, visual arts, motion pictures and music throughout history have always been an integral part of communities to unite, to strengthen and to heal. I would like to continue creating those rhythms and melodies that move the young and old alike and to witness our shared humanity blossom within a melodic movement.

I am eager to find out how this project will provide a doorway of inspiration and how it will help mix up my own process of creation. We hope to make a studio album, music videos as well as to present the most innovative performances along with some of the best performing, visual artists, film makers and like minded souls. Through our collaborations, we hope to effectively spread our messages and influences through music, acting as stronger, wider bridge between cultural diversity.

07-25-2018 | Stipend

Summer Stipend 2018 Application is Now Closed

Thank you to everyone who applied.

Finalists for the 2018 Stipend will be posted right here on July 25, 2018.

07-22-2018 | Stipend

Shout or whisper? You decide.

Applications for the Macktez Summer Stipend — our annual development grant of $1,000 — are now being accepted. For more than a dozen years Macktez has been encouraging the creative people we work with to pursue and complete the personal projects that may languish without a helpful push.

Applications are due July 21.

Following the project plan model we use at Macktez, we’ve shared this step-by-step guide, including recommended deadlines, specific actionable tasks, and time estimates. Some of those steps include reaching out to friends to help you brainstorm and edit your application — which reminds us that even our personal projects involve some level of collaboration.

So a word or two about collaboration:

Whenever we work with other people, we need to communicate ideas, plans, and expectations in a way that is clear and respectful. But with so many communication tools available — phone, text, email, chat, Slack, megaphone — how do we know what’s best?

We’ve all been in situations where the wrong tool is used. We’ve sat in large meetings where only two people are doing all the talking and making all the decisions. Or been included on an email thread that gets way out of control. We’ve gotten a series of texts from a colleague that require multi-step answers. (Our thumbs are just not that fast.)

There’s no one tool that’s right for all cases. In an office environment, there need to be accepted protocols and tools that everyone uses to communicate. When the project you’re working on is personal, however, and the collaboration you’re requesting is probably a favor, you need to make your own thoughtful decision about how to communicate appropriately.

When we evaluate communication tools for clients, we evaluate their needs along three axes:
– Long form vs. Short form
– Many-to-many vs. One-to-one
– Synchronous vs. Asynchronous

Can you explain what you need in one sentence, or do you need a big canvas with context, charts, and footnotes? This is the difference between sending a Twitter DM and sharing a Google Drive project folder.

Are you making social plans with five friends, or sharing something personal with each one individually? In other words, do you want to include everyone on one group text or Doodle poll, or will you set aside time for a few private phone calls?

Finally, do you need an immediate response or can it wait? That is, should you interrupt your friends with phone calls, or is it better to send them emails they can reply to more thoughtfully when they have the time?

Asking yourself these kinds of questions — and then choosing to communicate based on the answers — shows respect to the people whose help you need and will make your collaboration much more effective.

(For example, a company that values complete paragraphs and documentation over immediate response is not a good candidate to adopt Slack.)

We talk about these ideas in our Working Yellow workshops.


Summer Stipend 2018

So if you are working on a personal project, and you think $1,000 would help you cross the finish line, we want to hear about it.

We evaluate applications on three simple criteria: originality, relevance, and conviction. One Stipend recipient will be selected from our all-star panel.

Again, the deadline is July 21.

(Application is now closed.)

06-15-2018 | Stipend

Summer Stipend 2018 Application Worksheet

It’s helpful to prepare properly for an application like this, both to make sure you submit your best proposal on time, and also to give you the chance to think about your project in a clear, directed way.

Timeline

Don’t procrastinate. Set yourself a clear schedule between now and the deadline on July 25 to make sure you submit the best application possible.

Monday 6/18/2018 (0.25 hour)
– Read through the whole application at mackez.com/stipend so you know what’s expected.
– Print out this page. (Or save it somewhere you can find it easily on 6/26.)
– Review your calendar and make schedule a couple of hours on or before 6/26 for the first set of tasks.

Monday 6/25/2018 (2 hours)
– Choose a comfortable space where you won’t be interrupted and have a pen, this worksheet, and your calendar handy.
– Enforce quiet time. (Put your cell phone in airplane mode or turn it off, close your email, close Facebook, close Pinterest … close everything.)
– Gather whatever materials you have for your project work to date.
– Make sketches of what needs to be done to complete your project. (We have our own favorite paper products we use for this process, available at store.macktez.com, but any will do.)
– Review the dates and tasks that follow and add an event to your calendar on or before each deadline.
– Choose a colleague you respect to ask for input and invite them to chat next week.

Monday 7/2/2018 (1 hour)
– Take a friend or colleague out for coffee to talk about your project. (Talking about your creative work out loud helps you to refine and improve how it sounds to other people.)
– Bring whatever materials you have for your project work to date and a pen and paper. (A yellow notebook, perhaps!)
– Pause to take notes while you talk.

Thursday 7/5/2018 (1 hour)
– Outline the schedule and budget for your project.
– Outline your project description. (Review your notes.)
– List the possible images you could submit with your application. (Note which ones already exist digitally, and which ones you would need to take or create.)

Friday 7/6/2018 (0.25 hour)
– Choose at least one friend or colleague to review, edit, and proofread your application on July 20 and reach out out to them to ask their help. (Make sure they know you’ll have a tight deadline right after that and need their comments back the next day.)

Monday 7/9/2018 (1 hour)
– Write a first draft of answers to all the questions on the application. (Write this up in a text editor or on paper. Don’t get too caught up in any one answer, and don’t try to edit yourself right away. Make sure you write something for each question.)

Thursday 7/11/2018 (1 hour)
– Revise your answers for a second draft. (This is where you can let yourself choose words more carefully and constructively.)

Saturday 7/15/2018 (1-2 hours)
– Take the picture or grab the image you will submit with your application.
– Upload it somewhere with a shareable link. (This can be your personal website, Flickr, Facebook, Picasa/Google Plus. To make sure it’s accessible to us make sure to log out of whatever service you are using and paste the site address in a new browser window. If you can see the image that way, we can also.)

Monday 7/16/2018 (0.5 hour)
– Send your draft application to the person who agreed to be your editor. (Remind them that you’re on a tight deadline and need their comments back by the following day.)
– Make sure you include the link to your application image. (So your editor can confirm that your image is accessible.)

Wednesday 7/18/2018 (0.5 hour)
– Follow-up with your editor and review their feedback closely. (Don’t include edits unless you’re convinced they make your application better. This is your project, not your editor’s.)

Thursday 7/19/2018 (1 hour)
– Choose a quiet space where you won’t be interrupted and revise your application. (This is nearly your final edit so take your time.)
– Many people find it easier to do final edits on paper, so if you don’t have a printer, allow time to go somewhere with one and generate a hard copy to review.

Friday 7/20/2018 (1 hour)
– Set yourself up in a space with internet access where you won’t be rushed and won’t be interrupted.
– Make one final proofread of your application and answers. (Double-check all spelling.)
– Pull up macktez.com/stipend and copy and paste your answers into the application fields.
– Double-check your email address. (If you get this wrong, we’ll never be able to tell you that you won!)
– Take a deep breath and review your application one last time.
– Click “Submit.”

Wednesday 7/25/2018 (0.25 hour)
– Check back at our website, like us on Facebook, follow our Twitter feed, or subscribe to our RSS feed to see if you’re one of the finalists.

Food for Thought

Creative work can be difficult to express in clear language, yet that’s exactly what this application asks you to do. Some of the more specific questions below may help you work out what about your project you would like to tell others to get them as excited about it as you are.

Goal
– What are you trying to accomplish?
– What problem are you looking to solve or question do you want to answer?
– Has anything like this ever been done before?
– If not, why are you the first to think of it?
– If yes, why are you compelled to do it yourself?

Budget
– How much have you spent so far on this project? (List the things you’ve paid for.)
– How much more will it cost to complete? (List what you need with cost estimates.)
– How would you fund this project without the Macktez Summer Stipend?

Timeline
– How long have you been thinking about this project?
– How long have you been working on this project?
– When do you expect to be finished?

Audience
– Is the finished project meant just for yourself or to be shared publicly?
– (Does that matter to you?)
– Is there anyone in particular you are hoping will see the finished project? Any venue that would be particularly appropriate?

Inspiration
– Do you remember the first time the idea for this project occurred to you?
– Has anyone else’s work inspired this project? If yes, who?
– Who or what motivates you to keep working on this project?

Process
– Do you work alone or collaboratively with others?
– Do you work at home or elsewhere?
– Do you work on this project every day, or in fits and starts?
– Do you work linearly or roundabout?

06-13-2018 | Stipend

2018 Stipend Panelists Announced

We are delighted to have the following colleagues, clients, and friends participating in the selection of our 2018 Summer Stipend recipient:

Nicholas de Monchaux is a designer, author, and Associate Professor of Architecture and Urban Design in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently Director of the Berkeley Center for New Media. He is also the author of Spacesuit: Fashioning Apollo, a cultural, physical, and intellectual history of the Apollo A7L spacesuit.

Kevin Dempsey is a commercial real estate professional with extensive and diverse experience in both corporate and startup clients. He has recently joined Managed By Q to expand their commercial project management team.

Nina Etnier is a Partner at Float Design Studios, working on high-end residential and commercial projects. She has been featured on the cover of Architectural Digest Italy and was named 2013 Best of the Year by Interior Design Magazine.
Harold Mann, president of Mann Consulting, is a long-time peer and friend from the west coast. He is an expert in user interface, pre-visualization of web products and services, and I.T. infrastructure.

Evan Stark is the VP of Engineering at Amper Music, an artificial intelligence-based composer allowing creatives to instantly create and customize original music for their own content.

Morey Talmor, founder of Talmor & Talmor & Talmor, a New York-based creative consultancy and design agency, creates work that spans disciplines including branding, creative direction, design for digital platforms, editorial, packaging, and creation.

​Dong-Ping Wong is a founding partner of Food New York and co-founder of Friends of + POOL, the world’s first water-filtering floating pool for New York City and one of the largest crowd-funded civic projects in the world. Dong is also a frequent public speaker at international venues such as the Municipal Art Society Summit, Olso Design Council, AIGA Design Week, Core 77 Conference, PSFK Conference, and the World Summit on Innovation.​

| Stipend

Macktez Summer Stipend Application opens June 15

Our annual stipend provides $1000 for your summer project.

Every summer, Macktez invites clients, friends, and complete strangers to tell us how $1000 would help them carry their personal projects across the finish line. Our panelists evaluate applications on three basic criteria — originality, relevance, and conviction — and in August we announce one Stipend recipient.

On June 15 applications open — bookmark macktez.com/stipend. Entries will be due the next month, on July 21. Finalists will be announced a week later, and our recipient will be selected just a few weeks after that.

The Summer Stipend application itself is designed with our methodology in mind. It includes a worksheet to help you define a clear schedule, choose deliberate actions, and focus your attention.

If you’d like to get reminders and updates from us as we hit each of the Stipend milestones, follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, or follow our Tumblr.

You can also review our previous recipients and their projects below.

05-29-2018 | Stipend

We lose things

Dogs are famously loyal, but they don’t have built-in GPS. That’s what dog tags are for — so lost pups can be reunited with their families even if they’re a long way from home.

It’s not only dogs we sometimes can’t find, and you don’t need to go far away to lose things. So dog tags can be useful on all sorts of items: luggage, wallets, toddlers’ mittens. Even something right in front of your face can benefit from a label that helps you to find more useful information about it.

STEP ONE

A small label is good because it can fit on almost anything.

Add a single ID that will tell you what this is, or who to contact to get more information: serial number, phone number, IP address, storage box number. Add the date so you know how current this information is.

(Pro-tip: use an ultra-fine Sharpie.)

STEP TWO

We like to label network and server equipment with either the item’s IP address or hardware ID from our asset database. Putting that label up front means you won’t have to go searching with a magnifying glass to find a serial number or product code.

And if you’re tagging actual dogs, be careful not to wake them up.

We label things

This past year, we’ve helped a lot of our clients move from one office to another, or renovate their existing space, or build out a brand new facility.

When that happens, we become packers and project managers, dismantling a server rack in one location and then carefully rebuilding it in a new one.

The specific items for which we are often responsible — network devices, large-scale storage, and servers — can be pretty generic looking, and, especially to the untrained eye, can be indistinguishable from each other. That’s where a clear label on the equipment itself, or on the box we are moving from point A to point B, is indispensable.

Large institutions often add an asset tag with barcode to every physical piece of equipment they own. If you are tracking something through a warehouse, that might make sense. But most of our clients function on a more human scale (and can’t read barcodes ), so a more flexible solution is more appropriate. With these labels, we can choose a meaningful ID that provides the most context.

And the yellow “M” in the corner of the label lets you know this is a number that someone at Macktez will be able to work with. (This can save us all a lot of time troubleshooting over the phone.)

Congratulations to Sylvia Ryerson, our 2017 Summer Stipend recipient

“Restorative Radio NY: Public Airwaves Through Prison Walls” is a deeply moving project to bridge the physical divide between individuals incarcerated in upstate New York and their families. Sylvia co-produces “audio postcards” with family members that are broadcast over public airwaves in order to reach their loved ones in prison as well as a general listening audience.

Prisoners are culturally and geographically isolated; so are their families. But studies across the board show that maintaining family connections is an important factor in successful reentry upon release. That’s why Sylvia’s project makes such an impact.

Find out more about Restorative Radio at macktez.com/stipend.

– The Team at Macktez

02-23-2018 | Happy New Year

Congratulations to Sylvia Ryerson, our 2017 Summer Stipend recipient

“Restorative Radio NY: Public Airwaves Through Prison Walls” is a deeply moving project to bridge the physical divide between individuals incarcerated in upstate New York and their families.

Sylvia co-produces “audio postcards” with family members that are broadcast over public airwaves, in order to reach their loved ones in prison as well as a general listening audience. You can read Sylvia’s stipend application here. And much more about this project here.

Our panelists had a lot of good things to say about Sylvia’s project:

This project “aspires to bridge a chasm between the incarcerated and their loved-ones when the conventional visitation isn’t possible due to distance, finances, etc.” and also the chasm “between those within the experience and those outside of it.”

“I was very drawn to the social mission behind this project. I often drive and ride past Upstate prisons and it’s always struck me how remote and inaccessible they are. Letting the prisoners connect more with their families can only be a good thing.”

“Incredible project. I strongly support this. Not only does it share the stories of who is behind the walls, but also of who is left behind. Not only are these stories for those inside, but they’re for all of us since we are all affected/connected.”

If the project interests you, it’s definitely worth listening to some of the previous work Sylvia has done; she has several audio files online here.

08-09-2017 | Stipend

2017 Summer Stipend Finalists Announced

Below are the application submissions from our finalists, currently being reviewed by our Summer Stipend Panelists:

Marcos Chavez

Project: DERT Books

Goal: I am working on launching a social entrepreneurship brand (called DERT) which works with student designers to re-imagine classic works of literature into newly packaged books. DERT books will be used as fundraising tools to raise money for a literacy charity. DERT has partnered with Parent-Child Home Program (a social services organization with over 50 years working with at risk pre-school children providing home visits and books in order to ensure school readiness for children nation wide).

Description: The $1000 stipend would be used to print 10 of our student designed classic books. Books will be printed using on-demand digital printing (blurb) and the purchase of 100 copies of 10 books will bring the price down in order to be able to maximize our profit margin (more we can donate) and allow for the price per book to be more competitive and inspire more sales.

We have worked with students to create a line of books that we are planning to launch later this year. We are seeking funding to do a low run 1st printing of a 12-20 books and are seeking funding for the cost of printing. Any amount of help would be appreciated, and with the $1000 maximum amount we would be able to print approximately 100 copies of 10 of our books.

Right now all our books are being finalized with proofreading completed and just minor design finalizations taking place on a handful of books. Getting a small inventory of books printed and having our shipping process on our site is needed, as well as finalizing the formation of a B-Corporation which we are in the process of setting up.

Click here for additional materials

Diane Jean-Mary

Project: Admittance

Goal: This summer, I have dedicated myself to producing a short film that showcases the talents and abilities of black and brown women in cinema. The film is culturally specific, but thematically broad, depicting the world of a Caribbean mother and her Caribbean American daughter.

“Admittance” is a short film, with an entirely black and brown female cast and crew. In an era of under representation in the film industry, this project is vital to producing a story that is of a cultural reality, while employing the skills and creativity of individuals of that cultural identity.

The aim of this project is to (1) showcase Caribbean/Caribbean American culture in a non-stereotypical existence, (2) promote the filmmaking skills of brown and black women, and (3) establish working relationships for future collaborations between the cast and crew. We have assembled a stellar crew and cast of amazingly creative women, and hope that this project will be the first of many collaborations.

Description: I am applying to use this $1,000 stipend to fund the post production needs of the short film “Admittance”. This film depicts a pivotal day in the lives of Fabiola and her daughter Nathalie, as the overprotective Caribbean mother discovers that her daughter has hidden a college application (and acceptance) to a school on the other side of the country. Fabiola is forced to reconsider her relationship with her daughter or ruin it for good.

My near term goal is to produce this short film for public viewing, in community spaces and in the film festival circuit. My long term goal is to use the short film as a proof of concept to get funding for the feature version of this script.

It is an honor to be considered for this funding. I thank you all for your consideration!

Rosa Nussbaum

Project: Golfers (Working Title)

Goal: I am making a hand drawn animated short.

I am a visual artist and am currently going to grad school at the University of Texas at Austin. I moved to Texas from the UK about a year ago.

Then, everything was strange and new and I couldn’t tell what was normal. It was as though the world had become magical again in a way that it was when I was a child; the world had become strange and illegible to me. When you’re young it isn’t clear what is real—dinosaurs or crocodiles or dragons. Here in Texas I was equally uncertain. Was half a house trying to turn a corner in the dead of night normal? (You could see in, there was furniture and there were personal belongings). When you don’t know what is normal the world becomes suspended between magic and the mundane. This is where stories live.

I have always worked with the aesthetics of narrative in my work (feel free to look at things I have previously done on my website https://rosanussbaum.com). I’m heavily influenced by animation and comic books, especially the studio Ghibli movies and Kirikou and the Sorceress, and I have always been drawn to surreal short stories (for example Gogol’s The Nose has always stayed with me).

Every day I cycle to school in the heat. On my way I pass a golf course that is hidden from the road by a tall ridge. The bike path is littered with golf balls, like strange eggs. I imagined them hatching into tiny golfers. This is what gave me the idea for the piece I want to make. I want to tell the story of the tiny golfers in an animated short that captures the strangeness and innocence of following a stray thought that springs from a fascination with the world and that takes something normal and makes it strange.

Description: A three minute (mostly) hand drawn animation of a girl who finds finds golf balls on the bike path whilst cycling and puts them in her bag. She cycles home and puts them under a heat lamp to incubate them. Overnight the golf balls hatch into tiny golfers and build a small golf course on her bedside table. Later, a lady comes by to pick some of them up and take them to their new home (like kittens when you have a litter). At first they are sad to leave their old home, but they quickly make new friends.

The focus will be on the tiny golfers; shaking hands, stepping back politely out of each other’s way, being excited and dismayed by turns. I want to make something that is strange and magical and endearing and humorous and gently pokes fun at what seems eminently normal.
The backgrounds will be detailed watercolors based on places I have seen. I’ve already gone out and done sketches and have started the final painting for one of them. They will move a bit (trees swaying in the wind, plants shaking, light changing) but mostly be static. There are three background locations. The characters will be painted with cel paint onto animation cels. I will buy the cel paint from The Cartoon Color Company (the only place you can buy cel paints in the US). I will use the stipend to buy the cel paints, a light box and cels themselves.

One of the reasons I want to make a short is that it can be seen by lots of people easily. I always try to make the content of my work accessible but when working in sculpture or performance it can really only be in one place at a time and often it has to be shown in art spaces. This way I can submit it to short film festivals and my local cinema and put it online and I can still show the drawings and cels along with the animation in a gallery context. Animation is an unforbidding medium that can be kind and charming whilst still exploring interesting imaginary worlds.
Of course there is a long line of absurdists animators and there is a lot of very interesting writing on what conceptual and political roots animation has. If you’re interested in reading more about that there is a great article by Zoe Beloff called Bodies Against Time.

Click here for additional materials

Jen Pitt

Project: SHIFT

Goal: We are trying to create a narrative short-film on the day in the life of two people who had to be apart in order to grow as humans. Our main character Andy, is a trans man who leaves his wild days and his relationship in San Francisco to move back home to rural Maine in order to feel like himself at home for the first time ever.

We think it is important to represent nontraditional stories in the film in order to demystify the trans condition.

Description: Our project is a narrative short-film. We have spent the summer shooting at the Barn Arts residency in Maine. The story is about Andy, a trans man who decides to go back to his small town home to transition so that he can confront his demons and reach peace.

In the film, Andy is adjusting to life back home when an old love, Holly, visits from San Francisco, bringing a lot of their emotional baggage with her. It is the first time she witnesses Andy as a trans man and they go through a series of awkward conversations until they are finally able to speak candidly and openly about their feelings and how they had to leave each other in order to find themselves. They do not fall back in love or resume their relationship, but they find closure and acceptance in a profoundly empathetic way.

We cast a trans male actor as the trans male and a lesbian woman as Holly and they collaborated on the writing of the script so as to insure accurate representation of otherwise underrepresented groups.

We have a crew of 5 people: two co-directors, a director of photography, an assistant camera person and a sound operator.

We are very pleased with our creative process and the ensuing results but need extra money in order to master edit the film so that we can submit it to festivals. We plan on submitting to many festivals, including The New York Experimental Queer Film Festival; the OUTsider Film Festival in Austin, Texas; The Teddy Awards in Berlin and other non-queer specific festivals so that we can carry this progressive and heartfelt story to as many audiences as possible.

We want to start a dialogue but we also want to move away from making trans a plot point and instead exploring these characters in their full dimensionality.

The Macktez stipend would be of great help for us to cross the finish line on a project we worked very hard on and believe so deeply in. Thank You.

Click here for additional materials

Sylvia Ryerson

Project: Restorative Radio: Public Airwaves Through Prison Walls

Goal: I am working to complete Restorative Radio NY, a radio series of “audio postcards” co-created with family members of people incarcerated in upstate New York. The postcards will be broadcast over public airwaves, reaching both prisoners and a general listening audience, transcending prison walls and changing public perceptions of who is behind them.

Description: Restorative Radio NY is an original audio art project. I am working with family members of those incarcerated in upstate NY to create a series of 5-15 minute length “audio postcards”. Each postcard will be broadcast over public airwaves to reach their loved ones in prison and a general listening audience. While our criminal justice system disproportionately affects People of Color in cities, since the 1980s, the majority of new prisons have been built in rural America. Thousands of prisoners find themselves culturally and geographically isolated, while the struggles their families endure go largely unrecognized – phone calls and travel are expensive, and visitation time is limited. Given these obstacles, it can become virtually impossible for many families to find the time and resources it takes to stay in touch with relatives in prison – and yet studies across the board show that maintaining connections with the outside world is a primary factor in successful reentry upon release.

From 2011-2014, I led the production of WMMT-FM’s nationally recognized “Calls from Home” program, which broadcasts phone messages from families to their relatives incarcerated in rural Appalachia. In 2015 I started Restorative Radio, determined to use the medium of sound to collaboratively create “audio postcards” that can express more than a voice message, and impact a broader audience in doing so. The goal: to work with prisoners’ families to capture the everyday sounds of their lives – a walk through their neighborhood, family gatherings, a child being put to bed – and then weave these soundscapes together with music and family voices speaking their personal hopes, dreams and memories, so that each postcard becomes a meditation on home and freedom. The project transcends prison walls and changes public perceptions of who is behind them.

I worked with nine families across the state of Virginia to complete a successful pilot series that aired on WMMT-FM and was met with critical acclaim. I am now expanding this project to New York State. I am partnering with the Osborne Association to work with families in New York City that have relatives incarcerated in upstate NY, many hours from home. I am also partnering with two public radio stations in rural NY (WGXC-FM and WJFF-FM) that collectively reach seven upstate prisons. This stipend would be used to complete the production of the Restorative Radio NY series, and to create a project website.

Click here for additional materials

Floating Museum

Project: Floating Museum presents Summer on the River

Goal: Floating Museum is a collaborative arts organization that creates temporary, site-responsive museum spaces to activate sites of cultural potential throughout Chicago’s neighborhoods. We engage local artists, historians, and organizations in events that challenge traditional museum thinking and generate community engagement and conversation.

This August, Floating Museum will bring the Chicago River alive robust, free, interactive public arts and culture programming. Celebrating the River’s industrial past, Floating Museum will transform a barge into an aesthetically striking mobile gallery inspired by “cabinets of curiosities”. A historic predecessor to museums, “cabinets of curiosity” often showcased a variety of unique objects from various collections to draw connections between art, history, nature, science, and fantasy. In this spirit, Floating Museum invites audiences to draw connections between curated artworks, performances, and cultural activities and the rich histories of the Chicago neighborhoods in which they were developed. Each partner engaged through our exhibit, be they an established cultural institution, individual artist, or young student, are in conversation with each other, allowing the display on the barge to become an aggregated expression of our city.

Description: Floating Museum will transform a barge into an aesthetically striking mobile gallery filled with art crates displaying work created by local artists and our collaborators. The barge will feature a towering pyramid-like structure comprised of wooden crates hand-crafted by Terry Dowd. Complementing the structure will be a 10ft reproduction of the bust of Jean Baptiste Point DuSable, honoring the founder of our city. Affixed to the front of the barge, a 9’ x 12’ LED screen will display video art, photography slides, and film screenings. Artists and partnering organizations have been invited to interpret the crates either as a display case for artwork they create or curate, or as a physical canvas to manipulate. Some of these crates will spill over onto the shoreline for viewers to encounter up close, where live performances and interactive programs will help complete the vibrant and joyful expression of our culturally diverse city.

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS: Miguel Aguilar, Marcus Alleyne, Kris Casey, Louis DeMarco, Bill Douglas, Assaf Evron, Krista Franklin, Maria Gaspar, Adam Hines, Yashua Klos, Pope L., Mary Mattingly, Cecil McDonald Jr., Jesse McLean, Derek Moore, Dan Peterman, Cheryl Pope, Kameelah Janan Rasheed, Fernando Ramirez, Cauleen Smith, Sheila Smith, Edra Soto, Lan Tuazon, JGV/WAR (Curator), Maria Villareal, Roman Villareal, Amanda Williams, and Avery R. Young and De Deacon Board

PARTICIPATING ORGANIZATIONS: DuSable Heritage Association, DuSable Museum of African American History, Graffiti Institute, Hyde Park Art Center, Intuit: The Center for Intuitive and Outsider Art, Project Onward, SkyArt, Southeast Chicago Historical Society, South Side Projections, T.R.A.C.E, West Pullman Park Special Rec. Program

Offering audiences a chance for a new kind of participation, each site the barge will be docked at becomes a gallery, with a collection of art and performance that knits together to tell a story of our city that is as soulful, energetic, and creative as the people that keep this city moving. Each location will host programs and events around the arrival of the barge, and are mirrored from site to site so that visitors become part of shared experience across the city. Wednesdays will feature a Song Circle, led by renowned poet and vocalist Avery R. Young, offering a rare glimpse into the creative process of some of this city’s most remarkable blues and gospel voices. Thursdays will feature Breaking Bread sessions, with a panel of community stakeholders that will lead an informal group discussion. We will talk as neighbors, as Chicagoans, and as family, over food, about topics related to each individual site we are at. Fridays the Floating Museum will sponsor a live music event at a local establishment to support neighborhood talent and camaraderie. Saturdays will feature our collaborative building exercise Sticks and Tape. This interactive, guided process provides an accessible way for people of all ages to create a temporary (and often expansive) art structure out of the humble materials of sticks and tape.

Programming for the Summer on the River will begin the first week of August at SkyART in South Chicago, then the barge will dock at Park 571 Eleanor Boathouse for a week, make it’s way up to the Riverwalk for a two week duration, and then the crates will be unloaded into the Polk Bros Park on Navy Pier and be on view through the fall.

Wandering through this unique free, outdoor gallery visitors will encounter work created by world-class, Chicago-based artists, as well as displays highlighting the hidden gems of our City’s culturally rich neighborhoods. Our summer programming schedule will balance the rare peace that the riverfront offers amid the city with insightful discussions, joyful dance sessions, and rare joint performances from some of our city’s most talented musicians and singers.

This summer, we invite everyone to join us on the River, and discover Chicago anew.

Click here for additional materials

07-25-2017 | Stipend